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Behind the Design | Nanimarquina Silhouette

Nanimarquina Silhouette

 

After success of the first collaboration with designer Jaime Hayón in 2017, Nanimarquina presents Silhouette, a collection of rugs for indoor and outdoor use that highlights the acclaimed casual style of the Valencian based designer and artist.

 

Depicted with a delicate stroke, the illustration defines the silhouettes of several imaginary characters that intertwine and coexist in a beautiful composition.

Hayón subtly introduces color through small elements brimming with personality that help to interpret each of the images.

Nine faces are distributed at different angles so that the rug can be viewed from any perspective, fitting perfectly in any space.

Through this new collaboration with Jamie Hayón, Nanimarquina introduces the embroidery on kilim techniques for the first time. A laborious process handmade in Pakistan, the chain stitch embroidery adds texture and a soft volume that emphasizes the sinuousness of the illustration.

Despite its delicate appearance, it is a sturdy technique suitable for both residential and commercial use.

Nanimarquina also presents, for the first time, an outdoor hand-tufted rug, developed with 100% recycled PET fiber and produced in India. This combination provides great utility while transferring a sense of well-being that is needed for an outdoor space.

 

 

Born in Madrid in 1974, Jamie Hayón enjoys an illustrious career in the recent history of contemporary design.

His exhibition entitled “Mediterranean Digital Baroque” at the David Gill Gallery in London, and the collections of bathrooms he designed for ArtQuitect marked the beginning of his meteoric international rise, which was then established with the BD Showtime collection and his subsequent work with companies such as Camper, Llandró, Bisazza, Swarovsky, and Moooi.

Learn more about Spanish designer, Jamie Hayón and his collaboration with Nanimarquina design inspiration behind the Silhouette:

Did you specifically create the illustration thinking that it would be a rug? And if not, what made you feel it would work well as a rug?

It’s a freehand drawing, similar to the work in my sketchbooks. I consider the disposition, which was interesting from different angles; in other words, it would work for a rug. 

You are a compulsive illustrator, where do your characters come from? Specifically, what is the story behind the figures in this drawing, and their personality?

There are infinite characters that are part of my imaginary. They change and evolve, according to my current interests. There are characters that are endearing, others are more ironic, and some even provoke fear on occasion. In the case of characters, what I am most interested in is the ability to transmit emotions.

From the sketch to the product, what happens when one of your personal drawings becomes an object? Something to be shared and interpreted by others?

This happens in very exceptional cases in which the format, material, and use are ideal to portray emotivism through the figurative. Rugs for Nanimarquina are the perfect example; the format is ideal to be able to work with absolute freedom, similar to a painting or tapestry.

Compared to the first collaboration, we could say that this proposal is less busy, depicting fewer strokes, less characters, and more restrained use of colour. How has your work evolved? Is this style a common feature in your current projects?

I wanted to contribute a different stylistic language able to integrate with other facets of character, more serene. Above and beyond the evolution of my work, I wanted to complement our collaboration and expand the range of use.

This is the second time you have worked with Nanimarquina. What would you highlight about the collaboration with Nanimarquina?

Working with Nanimarquina is a pleasure. Collaborators are able to work surrounded by respect and mutual admiration. The knowledge regarding each fibre and material, the variety of techniques, and the close work with artisans is palpable in the result of Nanimarquina rugs. 

You design different types of objects, what attracts you to specifically design rugs?

I am attracted by the possibility of working with an object from a purely artistic perspective, witnessing the translation of artistic expression onto a vary different surface than that of paper or canvas.

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